You are here: Home Speakers Student Speakers

Student Speakers

Main Content

Anastasia Manesis

Main Content

 

Anastasia ManesisAnastasia Manesis

Anastasia (Tasha) grew up on the Jersey shore before attending college at Northeastern University in Boston, MA, where she obtained a B.S in Biochemistry and a B.A in Asian Studies with a minor in Chinese language. While at Northeastern, she worked for a United States defense company, QinetiQ North America, working on the design and construction of enzyme-embedded electrospun fabrics capable of the decontamination of biological and chemical warfare agents. She then moved to a position at GlaxoSmithKline working as an assistant organic chemist where she helped with the construction of small molecule DNA-encoded libraries for screening against drug compounds. 

In Fall of 2013, she started her Ph.D work in Biochemistry at Ohio State University, joining the lab of Dr. Hannah Shafaat in Spring of 2014. Her work focuses on understanding nickel metalloenzymes relevant to the regulation of global gas cycles and building a model system to help characterize critical nickel intermediates found in those nickel enzymes. 

Daniel DeRosha

Main Content

Daniel DeRosha

DeRosha Image

Originally from the rural Midwestern paradise of Elk Rapids, Michigan, Dan DeRosha attended Carleton College as a William Carleton Scholar. He conducted undergraduate research in the lab of Professor Matt Whited synthesizing new PSiP pincer ligands, and was the recipient of the James Finholt Prize in Inorganic Chemistry. For his senior thesis, Dan studied the work of Professor Robert Grubbs in olefin metathesis and had the opportunity to meet the Nobel laureate as part of his thesis exercise. After receiving his B.A. in 2013, Dan moved to New Haven to conduct his graduate studies under the tutelage of Patrick Holland at Yale. His graduate work has explored the reactivity of diketiminate supported cobalt and iron complexes with O2, CO2, and diazoalkanes, in addition to the electronic structure and reactivity of nitrogenase inspired iron sulfur clusters. Outside of the glovebox, Dan enjoys alpine skiing, running, and singing tenor in The Citations, Yale Graduate School’s co-ed a cappella group. 

Erin McCarthy

Main Content

Erin McCarthy

Erin McCarthy

Erin McCarthy is originally from Erie, PA. She attended Mercyhurst University and graduated in 2013 with a B.S. in Biochemistry. Following her graduation, she was employed at Hero BX in Erie, PA where her work focused on the production of biodiesel on an industrial scale. She came to Penn State in the Fall of 2014 to join the Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Molecular Biology (BMMB) program, and joined the lab of Howard Hughes Investigator Squire J. Booker in February 2015. Since that time, her work has centered on understanding the mechanism by which radical SAM enzymes that destroy their iron-sulfur cluster cofactors during catalysis get regenerated for subsequent turnover. In particular, the focus of her research has been lipoyl synthase which sacrifices its auxiliary cluster to use as a sulfur source in the biosynthesis of lipoic acid. Her research seeks to expand our understanding of a variety of poorly understood molecular processes, including sulfur appendage to unactivated carbon centers and Fe–S cluster assembly and delivery. 

Siobhán MacArdle

Main Content

Siobhán MacArdle

Siobhan MacArdle

Siobhán MacArdle was born in Berkeley, California and graduated from Berkeley High School in 2010. She then moved to NewYork to attend Barnard College where she received a B.A. in Biochemistry. During her undergraduate education, Siobhán worked in Professor Marisa Buzzeo’s lab at Barnard College toward the development of an electrochemical sensor for microRNA. This research sparked Siobhán’s interest in the field of bioelectrochemistry and she wanted to continue studying biological systems using electrochemical techniques. While at Barnard, Siobhán worked as a teaching assistant in the organic chemistry laboratory and as a bottler and distilling intern at Kings County Whiskey Distillery in Brooklyn. After graduating from Barnard College in 2014, she moved to Dublin, Ireland to work for Professor Dermot Diamond at the National Centre for Sensor Research at Dublin City University. Here, her research involved synthesizing and characterizing pH- and light-responsive hydrogels for use in electrochemical sensors.

 

Siobhán began her graduate education in the Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Division at Caltech in 2015 and joined Professor Jackie Barton’s lab. The focus of her work is the electrochemical characterization of the 4Fe-4S cluster of S. cerevisiae Dna2. Siobhán’s work ranges from the biochemistry of overexpression and purification of S. cerevisae Dna2 in E. coli to the DNA-modified electrochemistry pioneered by the Barton lab. She also synthesizes the multiplexed gold electrodes used by the group in the Kavli Nanoscience Institute at Caltech.

 

 

Siobhán has been a member of the Caltech Women in Chemistry Committee for the last two years.

Spencer Kerns

Main Content

 Spencer Kerns

Kerns Image

Spencer was born and raised in Mobile, AL. He attended Auburn University beginning in 2010 and received his B.A. in both chemistry and Spanish in 2014. As an undergraduate, Spencer did research in the lab of Dr. Anne Gorden, studying quinoxolinol salen ligands for selective actinide coordination for sensing applications. Additionally, he was a member of the Auburn University swimming and diving team and competed in the 2012 U.S. Olympic Trials. Spencer began graduate school at the University of Texas at Austin in the fall of 2014, joining the lab of Dr. Mike Rose. He is currently studying the synthesis and reactivity of synthetic models of the enzyme mono-iron hydrogenase. 

Document Actions