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Michael T. Green

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Michael T. Green

Professor of Chemistry, School of Physical Sciences
Professor of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences
University of California, Irvine

Michael T. Green

Education:

  • B.S. Chemistry, B.S. Physics, Texas A&M University, 1992
  • M.S. Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 1994
  • Ph.D. Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 1998
  • Burroughs-Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellow, California Institute of Technology, 1998-2001
  • National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellow, California Institute of Technology, 2000-2002


Honors and Awards:

  • Dillon Steele Lecturer, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, 2015
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow, 2014
  • Honored for distinguished contributions to the field of bioinorganic chemistry, particularly in the elucidation of structure function relationships critical to biological C-H bond activation
  • Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow, 2006
  • Beckman Young Investigator Award, 2004
  • National Science Foundation Career Award, 2004
 
Learn more about The Green Group here.

Frank Neese

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Frank Neese

Director
The Max Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung

Frank Neese

Frank Neese received both his Diploma (Biology – 1993) and Ph.D (Dr. rer. Nat. – 1997) working with Prof. P. Kroneck at the University of Konstanz. He performed postdoctoral work at Stanford University with Prof. E. I. Solomon from 1997 to 1999, then returned to Konstanz where he completed his habilitation in 2001. He joined the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Bioinorganic Chemistry in 2001 as a group leader, where he directed a research group until accepting the position of full Professor and Chair of Theoretical Chemistry at the University of Bonn in 2006. In 2008, Neese returned part time to the MPI as one of its rare “Max Planck Fellows” within the Department of Inorganic Chemistry. In 2011, he became Director of the MPI for Bioinorganic Chemistry, renamed in 2012 in MPI for Chemical Energy Conversion, where he heads the department of Molecular Theory and Spectroscopy. In 2005, Neese received the Hellmann Award of the German Theoretical Chemical Society for the Development and Application of new Theoretical Methods and subsequently the Klung-Wilhelmy Weberbank Award in 2008 and the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Award of the German Science Foundation in 2010. In 2013, he was inducted into the Leopoldina Nationale Akademie der Wissenschaften (German National Academy of Sciences). He was Associate Editor (2011-2014) of the journal PhysChemChemPhys and is a Member of the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Sciences (IAQMS, since 2012). Since 2015 Frank Neese is Associate Editor of the journal Inorg. Chem. and as of 2016 he is Member of the Editorial Board of the review book series Struct. Bond.. As of 2016 Neese has been appointed as an active member of the International Advisory Board for the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry (IOCB) of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague and he was elected as a new Member of the Review Board „Physical and Theoretical Chemistry“ in the field of „General Theoretical Chemistry“ of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation, DFG). Frank Neese is the author of more than 440 scientific articles in journals of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Physics. His work focuses on the Theory of Magnetic Spectroscopies (electron paramagnetic resonance, magnetic circular dichroism) and their experimental and theoretical application, local pair natural orbital correlation theories, spectroscopy oriented configuration interaction, electronic and geometric structure and reactivity of transition metal complexes and metalloenzymes. He is lead author of the ORCA program.

Learn more about The Max Planck Institut für Kohlenforschung here.

Lance Seefeldt

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Lance Seefeldt

Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Utah State University

 Lance Seefeldt

Lance Seefeldt is a Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Utah State University.  His research seeks to gain insights into the mechanism of the metalloenzyme nitrogenase.  To acheive this goal, a wide range of methods are utilized.

Learn more about Dr. Seefeldt and his research here.

Joanne Stubbe

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Joanne Stubbe

Novartis Professor of Çhemistry emeritus
Massachussetts Institute of Technology

 Joanne Stubbe

One of Dr. Stubbe's major contributions has been to our understanding of the free radical chemistry of ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs), enzymes essential in the transformation of RNA building blocks to DNA building blocks.  These enzymes provide the dNTPs required for DNA replication and repair and play and essential role in the fidelity of these processes.  Dr. Stubbe has identified the importance of three unique types of thiyl-radicals in the nucleotide reduction process itself.  Her studies have led to the design of a mechanism-based inhibitor gemcitabine, currently used clinically.  We have elucidated an unprecedented 35 A oxidation by the stable tyrosyl radical in one subunit of RNR of a cysteine to a thiyl radical in the active site of the second subunit.  The oxidation involves multiple proton coupled electron transfer steps and three transient tryosyl radical intermediates.  Dr. Stubbe has elucidated the mechanism of biosynthesis and repair of the unprecedented diferric-tyrosyl radical cofactor essential for all class I RNR catalysis.

In 2010 Dr. Stubbe identified the first, dimanganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor in the class Ib RNRs.  These cofactors, distinct from the diferric-tyrosyl radical cofactors in human RNR, are likely unique to many pathogenenic organisms.  Dr. Stubbe has elucidated the biosynthetic pathways of this cluster that represents a new target from antibacterial therapeutics.   Most recently, Dr. Stubbe's focus has turned to the quaternary structure complexity of RNRs and its alteration by the clinically unsed drugs gemcitabine and clofarabine.

 

 

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